School Adipose Rebound

Juan farak gomez

Department of Medicine, Rafael Nunez University Corporation, Cartagena de Indias, Colombia

Corresponding author

Juan farak gomez

Department of Medicine, Rafael Nunez University Corporation, Cartagena de Indias, Colombia

Received: March 09, 2021; Accepted: March 23, 2021; Published: March 30, 2021

 
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Abstract

It is defined as the significant increase in body fat content during the first year of life, followed by a decrease that ends around 4 to 6 years of age, to consequently increase until the end of adolescence

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It is defined as the significant increase in body fat content during the first year of life, followed by a decrease that ends around 4 to 6 years of age, to consequently increase until the end of adolescence, being significantly higher in sex feminine. This increase from 4 or 6 years of age is known as adipose rebound. There is evidence that shows that the earlier the onset of adipose rebound, the greater the risk of obesity in later ages. It should be noted that parental obesity is associated with an earlier rebound [1]. Several studies have concluded that the weight of the newborn and the diet at this stage have an influence on excess weight during childhood and adolescence. Children fed with breastfeeding would have a lower risk of developing obesity than artificially breastfed and this protective effect could increase with the duration of breastfeeding. In addition, the breastfed infant is more able to self-regulate its feeding than the formulafed infant [2]. The importance of knowing this condition lies in the fact that overweight and obesity are increasingly frequent situations in childhood, which are usually acquired in the first years of life. It has been shown that overweight or obese boys and girls are more likely to maintain excess weight during the school period and have a greater risk of being overweight in adulthood, which is associated with a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hepatic steatosis, among others [3]. Given this scenario, we must take measures that prevent the development of overweight and obesity in children, such as good and complete breastfeeding, physical activity and even measures such as the elimination of animated characters that encourage the acquisition and consumption of foods with sweeteners.

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